7 common mistakes new divers make – Part 2

7 common mistakes new divers make – Part 2

7 common mistakes new divers make – Part 2

As I advanced in the previous post, in 7 common mistakes new divers make Part 2, I would like to go into details.

3. Neglecting the rule of always dive with a buddy

Even though during the Open Water Diver course much emphasis is placed on the idea that diving is an activity that has to be practised with a buddy, most new divers forget it as soon as they get underwater. At this moment, their mind is only focused on ensuring their own safety.

So please, keep in mind the rule requiring all recreational divers to go with a buddy. This rule was established precisely to increase the safety of both pair members. You must bear in mind that the sum of the two buddies has a duplicated piece of the total gear, which does also include the air tank. Together you have the air of your own tank plus your buddy’s. You may thus help each other if needed.

So please, keep in mind the rule requiring all recreational divers to go with a buddy. This rule was established precisely to increase the safety of both pair members. You must bear in mind that the sum of the two buddies has a duplicated piece of the total gear, which does also include the air tank. Together you have the air of your own tank plus your buddy’s. You may thus help each other if needed.

It is also recommended that you exercise, whenever possible, either mentally or in practice buddy breathing in case you get into an out-of-air situation. You have learnt it in the basic diving course.

4. Equalising your ears only when you feel pain

During training, the ear equalising manoeuvre is repeatedly emphasised. This should be practised constantly. However, new divers only remember it when they start to feel pain.

You must bear in mind, that you feel pain because your eardrum is stressed and your Eustachian tubes are compressed. Equalising under such conditions is more difficult. If it happens to you, just go up a bit. This reduces pressure in eardrum and Eustachian tubes. Then practice equalising again. Do it until the balance has been re-established, and do not stop doing. Then, you may continue your descend at the pace that you own ears allow.

If you feel difficulties in equalising, which may be due to the particular morphology of your ears, or because you are not used to, it is recommended that you tell your Divemaster about it in advance. You probably may start your descent earlier, avoiding the embarrasing situation in which the rest of the group wait while you are trying to descend. Otherwise, you just only haste in descending with the associated risk of get yourself hurt.

5. Neglecting to keep your Divemaster (or your buddy) informed about air consumption.

This is another of the 7 common mistakes new divers make Part 2

As a rule, new recreational scuba divers are more aware of their SPG than more experienced divers. Neglecting a regular check their SPG is a mistake more likely to occur to moderately experienced divers rather than to the new ones.

As new divers acquire more experience, they start neglecting to keep control of the remaining air in the tank. So, remember to keep your attention focused on it. As a matter of fact, what else can be more important when diving than being aware of how much air is left? Being more focused on which picture you will upload in Facebook® or where you hang your Go-Pro® camera shouldn’t be more important that having a look at your SPG.

I would not like to end this post, 7 common mistakes new divers make Part 2, without stressing the following. It is essential that you are not only well aware of how much air remains in your tank, but you must also inform your Divemaster and/or your buddy about it. Especially when the pressure reaches the 120/100 bars and 50 bars (reserve air supply) limits. During the brief previous to a guided dive, the Divemaster will go through the diving signals. Nonetheless, remember that you only need to show your SPG to the Divemaster and/or your buddy, if you do not quite remember signals.

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